Train Video Reviews – Northeast Rails Remembered II (DVD)

March 27th, 2011
Northeast Rails Remembered II DVD from Charles Smiley Presents

Northeast Rails Remembered II DVD from Charles Smiley Presents

Northeast Rails Remembered II on DVD (2011) makes its debut March of 2011 highlighting the end of the Delaware and Hudson (D&H) in the early 1990s. It succinctly covers the history of the D&H, and gives interesting tidbits about some of the towns, industry, and history surrounding the rail line and its transition to Canadian Pacific (CP) Rail.

All the power you will see in this video is diesel-electric from GP38s to SD50s & B23-7s to C40-8s all built between 1967 and 1991 including paint from: Canadian Pacific (CP), Chesapeake & Ohio (CO), Conrail (CR), Chessie Seaboard Multiplied Transportation (CSXT), Delaware & Hudson (D&H), Grand Trunk (GT), Maine Central (MEC), Missouri Pacific (MP), Norfolk Southern (NS), New York, Susquehanna & Western (NYSW), Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac (RFP), Santa Fe (SF), Seaboard System (SBD), Seaboard Coast Line (SCL), SOO Lines (SOO), Southern Railway (SOU), as well as some leased power from GATX & PLMX.

Delaware & Hudson power from Northeast Rails Remembered II DVD by Charles Smiley Presents

Delaware & Hudson power from Northeast Rails Remembered II DVD by Charles Smiley Presents

That’s a lot of variety but nothing like the variety of rolling stock witnessed during the 93 minutes of this program. Aside from the road names already mentioned you’ll see the following in varying quantities: Ashley, Drew & Northern (ADN), Bangor & Aroostook (BAR), Bay Line Railroad (BAYL), Boston & Maine (BM), Berlin Mills Railway (BMS), Burlington Northern (BN), Columbus & Greenville (CAGY), Corinth & Counce Railroad Company (CCR), Canadian National (CN), Green Bay & Western (GBW), Greenville & Northern (GRN), Illinois Central Gulf (ICG), Illinois Terminal (ITC), Lamoille Valley (LVRC), Milwaukee Road (MILW), Minneapolis, Northfield & Southern (MNS), Norfolk Western (NW), Oregon, California & Eastern (OCE), Pittsburgh & Shawmut (P&S), Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR), Quebec Central (QC), Reading (RDG), Sandersville Railroad (SAN), Southern Pacific (SP), St. Louis Southwestern Railway (SSW), Terminal Railway Alabama State Docks (TASD), and Union Pacific (UP).

But wait! There’s more! In addition to all that you get to see acid trains, coal trains (I was pleased to see a bunch of Shawmut Line hoppers!), iron ore trains and phosphate trains. Also checkout the Rail Analyzer Car and Track Geometry Car courtesy of Conrail, a few passenger cars via Chicago & Northwestern (CNW) and North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDT) and a great look at the James E. Strates Railroad Carnival.

James E. Strates Railroad Carnival from Northeast Rails Remembered II from Charles Smiley Presents

James E. Strates Railroad Carnival from Northeast Rails Remembered II from Charles Smiley Presents

Phew! That’s a lot of variety.  Which in some ways dictates the overall form of the video. Although there is some narration regarding D&H and some of the history and locales, the majority of this film is simply presenting run-by after run-by of colorful trains. Many trains will make an appearance several times throughout the video as it passes through different locations. To some, that might sound dangerously boring but as a chronicle of graffiti-free trains from a time gone by it excels, giving you plenty of opportunities to view the trains from different vantage points. This format also allows you to experience much uninterrupted natural sounds from the trains with almost no competing sounds from the environment. It provides a nice, pure train experience.

Shot by Tom Luckey (Mountain Grades of the B & O, Northeast Rails Remembered) this video was filmed in the late 1980s and early 1990s throughout all the seasons (though winter/fall seems to dominate with most shots containing bare northeastern trees). Aside from some landmarks like the Lehigh River, Hill to Hill Bridge, and Bethlehem Steel Plant the frequency of winter forests are a nice neutral backdrop for all the colorful trains to stand out against.

Northeast Rails Remembered II Map from Charles Smiley Presents

Northeast Rails Remembered II Map from Charles Smiley Presents

Northeast Rails Remembered II is great for people who like diesel locomotives, lots of variety in road names, and appreciate seeing pre-graffiti trains of the northeast, particularly Pennsylvania. The majority of this film simply lets the trains roar by telling their own story however, it’s punctuated by the tried and true Charles Smiley maps and narration giving some reference and structure to what is a high volume, quality, and variety of train footage.

Great Train Expo – Portland, OR & Observations from the Road

February 24th, 2011

We just got back from the Great Train Expo in Portland, Oregon. It was our first time attending this show and it was fabulous, we are definitely planning on doing this show every year! Luckily most of the snow melted from the storm that passed through the day before we were set to leave so we made it up north without any problems. We arrived and got our booth set up with an assortment of new inventory including Walthers models, DVDs from TSG Multimedia, Woodland Scenics landscaping materials and figures, and lots of new shirts and hats among other goodies.

Cat Cook at The Short Line's booth at the Great Train Expo, Portland - Photo by Don Cook

Cat Cook at The Short Line's booth at the Great Train Expo, Portland - Photo by Don Cook

The show was at the Portland Metro Expo Center which is in North Portland across from Hayden Island and along North Portland Harbor. We stayed nearby at the Courtyard by Marriott from where I snapped this photo looking across the harbor at Hayden Island and Vancouver, Washington. You can see some of the Vancouver-Hayden Island Bridge in the background. This bridge (also known as the North Bank Bridge, the Columbia River Railroad Bridge, and BNSF Bridge 9.6) was constructed in 1908 and is a double-tracked swing through truss bridge. It is 2,808 feet long and has it’s longest span at 492 feet.

Hayden Island - Photo by Cat Cook

Hayden Island - Photo by Cat Cook

Of course there were lots of vendors and layouts. Those showing off their layouts included Rose City Garden Railway Society, Beaverton Modular Railroad Club, Longview Kelso & Rainier Railroad Club, Cascade Z Modelers, and the Portland Lego Users Group.

Cascade Z Modelers' Layout - Photo by Don Cook

Cascade Z Modelers' Layout - Photo by Don Cook

On the way home we passed this 1904 Baldwin 3′ Gauge locomotive painted in honor of the ongoing ‘civil war’ rivalry between the University of Oregon Ducks and Oregon State Beavers. It can be seen from Interstate 5 as you pass the Keizer Station Village Shopping Center, just north of the 45th parallel which is halfway between the Equator and the North Pole.

U. of Oregon/Oregon State Civil War Train - Photo by Cat Cook

U. of Oregon/Oregon State Civil War Train - Photo by Cat Cook

North of Roseburg we passed the new 6-million dollar Winchester Rail Switching Yard for Central Oregon and Pacific Railroad that opened in September of last year.

CORP's Winchester Rail Switching Yard - Photo by Cat Cook

CORP's Winchester Rail Switching Yard - Photo by Cat Cook

A bit further south, here is the North Umpqua River Bridge (also known as the Winchester Railroad Bridge and North Umpqua Railroad Bridge) built in 1906. It is on the Central Oregon & Pacific railroad in Winchester, Oregon.

North Umpqua River Bridge - Photo by Cat Cook

North Umpqua River Bridge - Photo by Cat Cook

Finally, just before we crested Sexton Summit we passed a couple of CSX Intermodal containers on trucks.

CSX Intermodal on I-5 - Photo by Cat Cook

CSX Intermodal on I-5 - Photo by Cat Cook

And then, we were home just in time for the next snow storm to pass through! We are looking forward to the next show on our agenda: the 23rd Annual Willamette Cascade Model Railroad Club Train Show & Swap Meet in Eugene, Oregon which is happening April 9th & 10th at Lane County Fairgrounds. We hope to see you there!

From the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad to Union Pacific in Dunsmuir

December 31st, 2010
We attended the Great Train Expo in Pomona, December 18th & 19th, despite the torrential downpour that turned Los Angeles into a rather large puddle a week before Christmas. Attendance was likely diminished due to the historic rainfall (this is the third wettest December since they started keeping track in 1877) but it was a successful show despite it, and Don and his son Alan (who helped out in my stead) met some fine Southern Californian train folks.

We spent the holiday down in So Cal where our respective families still reside.  I was given a tour of the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad, my dad’s N-scale layout which is under construction, and took some pictures.  Below you can see the roundhouse and turntable in the foreground of this photo with my dad inspecting some track in the back section.

Dad Working on the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad Photo by: Cat Cook

Bill Haigler Working on the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad - Photo by: Cat Cook

All of these switches work and the lights light up! It’s quite something.
The Control Panel for the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad - Photo by: Cat Cook

The Control Panel for the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad - Photo by: Cat Cook

Here you can see some, just some… of the detailed wiring involved in the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad. You can also see some washers used as counterbalances for the coal mechanisms.
Bill Haigler working on the wiring for the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad - Photo by Cat Cook

Bill Haigler working on the wiring for the Haigler Creek & Western Railroad - Photo by Cat Cook

On the way back home we took a spur of the moment jaunt into Dunsmuir, CA. Just as we pulled into town, so did a Union Pacific train coming from the south.  Don quickly navigated us down to the tracks and I jumped out to wave at the engineer and snapped this photo of the GE ES44AC and accompanying video in the nick of time.
UP 7736 (a GE ES44AC) entering Dunsmuir from the south - Photo by Cat Cook

UP 7736 (a GE ES44AC) entering Dunsmuir from the south - Photo by Cat Cook

And here’s a video of most of the rest of the train as it pulls into the station for a crew change:  Union Pacific pulls into Dunsmuir

I’ve been through Dunsmuir at least 8 times before while traveling on Amtrak’s Coast Starlight but as the schedule always puts the train there in the dark of night I’ve never seen the town properly before. Our plan is to go back and spend a day there since it is only a 2-hour drive from Merlin, OR.

A Semaphore in front of the Dunsmuir Post Office

A Semaphore in front of the Dunsmuir Post Office - Photo by Cat Cook

Happy new year to all and happy railroading!

Tilt-Shifting the Rogue Valley Railroad Show

December 2nd, 2010
Last weekend was the 33rd Annual Rogue Valley Train Show which was well-attended by happy train-lovin’ people. Here’s a picture of the show floor from my perch up in the balcony where our big ol’ booth was located.
Rogue Valley Model Train Show (Photo by: Catherine Cook)

33rd Annual Rogue Valley Model Train Show - November 27th & 28th 2010 Medford Armory (Photo by: Catherine Cook)

Have you heard of Tilt-Shift Photography? It’s a way of manipulating certain aspects of a photograph to make the subject appear smaller than it really is. For example when applying this technique to a picture of a football stadium full of people everything looks like it is actually a miniature, or model, if you will.  Often when we photograph our train layouts we try hard to avoid our models looking like models but this photography approach attempts to do just the opposite – make real life appear like a miniature model! I thought this was pretty cool so I decided to give it a go with some pictures from the train show… miniaturizing real-life people who are looking at miniature trains helps satisfy my daily recommended intake of irony, let’s proceed!

So I found a tutorial on how to accomplish this. Let me state first off, I am by no means a professional photographer, I’ve never taken any classes on the correct way to use a camera or frame a shot so forgive the amateur mistakes you may be subjected to in this blog.  First we have to choose a photograph. Possibly the most important requirement of a successful tilt-shift fake miniature picture is having the right kind of photograph. You want to mimic that the viewer is looking down at a miniature so a shot from a higher vantage point looking down at the subject is key. We are going to work with the photo shown above. Next you will need a photo editor, I’m going to use Photoshop 5.0.  Here’s how we turn the above photo into a fake miniature photo:

  1. Open photo in Photoshop
  2. Press Q to enter Quick Mask
  3. Select Reflected Gradient Tool in the Toolbox
  4. Left click in the center of where you want your ‘in focus’ section of your photo to be and drag straight up to where you want it to start going ‘out of focus’ (this adds a hazy red fog to part of your photo)
  5. Press Q to exit Quick Mask
  6. Click the Filter drop down menu and select Blur>Gaussian Blur and set the Radius to 7.5 pixels (the tutorial referred to above says to use Lens Blur but my version doesn’t have that, Gaussian Blur seems to do a similar effect)
  7. Press Ctrl-D to deselect the areas you selected with the gradient tool
  8. Click the Image drop down menu, select Adjust>Hue/Saturation and increase the Saturation by 80 (or to your taste)
  9. Click the Image drop down menu, select Adjust>Curves and drag the tonal curve until you like the look of the shadows (may not be necessary)
  10. Save it as a new image, voila!

    Tilt-Shift Fake Miniature Version

    Tilt-Shift Fake Miniature Version of the 33rd Annual Rogue Valley Train Show Photo (Photo by Catherine Cook)

This should (and does to some extent) look smaller, though I could use some more practice.  Below you can check out some more pictures from the show before and after my attempts at Tilt-Shifting them. First we have the Rogue Valley Model Railroad Club’s Layout:

Before Shot - Rogue Valley Model Railroad Club Layout (Photo by Catherine Cook)

Rogue Valley Model Railroad Club Layout (Photo by Catherine Cook)

After Shot - Rogue Valley Model Railroad Club Layout (Photo by Catherine Cook)

Tilt-Shift Version - Rogue Valley Model Railroad Club Layout (Photo by Catherine Cook)

Here’s another before and after shot showcasing the Siskiyou Toy Train Club:
Before Shot - Rogue Valley Train Show (Photo by Catherine Cook)

Siskiyou Toy Train Club - Rogue Valley Train Show (Photo by Catherine Cook)

After Shot - Rogue Valley Train Show (Photo by Catherine Cook)

Tilt-Shift Version - Siskiyou Toy Train Club - Rogue Valley Train Show (Photo by Catherine Cook)

Before Shot - Rogue Valley Train Show (Photo by Catherine Cook)

National Railway Historical Society, Southern Oregon Chapter - Rogue Valley Train Show (Photo by Catherine Cook)

After Shot 2 - Rogue Valley Train Show (Photo by Catherine Cook)

Tilt-Shift Version - National Railway Historical Society, Southern Oregon Chapter - Rogue Valley Train Show (Photo by Catherine Cook)

Well that’s it for my initial foray into Tilt-Shift Fake Miniature photography. To see some well-done pictures using this technique (by people who know what they are doing) check out this page: Tilt-Shift Photography

Happy Railroading!

Klamath Model Railroad Show & New Donner Pass DVD Release

November 2nd, 2010

October 23rd & 24th was the 3rd annual Model Railroad Show in Klamath Falls, Oregon and we brought all our goodies over the hill (and through the woods) to share with the good folks of Klamath County. This is a nice little show hosted by the Klamath Rails Model Railroad Club. Members of the club show off their large HO scale layout  rain or shine (in this case it was rain and the rain threatened to bring down the ceiling tiles of the Klamath County Fairgrounds but the dedicated club members and show-goers were not deterred!)

Klamath Rails Model Railroad Club Layout (Photo by Cat Cook)

Klamath Rails Model Railroad Club Layout (Photo by Cat Cook)

The Rogue Valley Model Railroad Club also brought their traveling HO layout. Between the two layouts most of the exhibit hall was filled with railroad goodness. Along the edges of the exhibit hall were vendors of varying goods and the Klamath & Western Railroad out of Chiloquin, Oregon which offered rides on their passenger-ready ‘model’ locomotive.

The trains were great, of course, but it’s the people who make train shows especially enjoyable. Steve Hart and the rest of the Klamath Rails Model Railroad Club members made us feel welcome (this was our first time at the show.) It was great to see Bruce, Brad and the other members from the Rogue Valley Model Railroad Club, we will be seeing more of them next month at the Annual Rogue Valley Train Show at the Medford Armory November 27th & 28th.

We met some new friends as well. Our next door neighbors at the show included Al from Trains & Things (you can find him at most train shows throughout the Pacific Northwest with his selection of railroad Books, DVDs, and T-shirts) and Bob from Robert Gavora, Fine and Rare Books who has a huge selection of hard to find railroad books, magazines, time tables, manuals, and more! Both of these gentlemen will be at the Annual Rogue Valley Train Show in Medford so if you attend be sure to drop by their booths as well!

Donner Pass: Stacks in the High Sierras

Donner Pass: Stacks in the High Sierras

We’ve been featuring DVDs from 7Idea Productions for about a year now, at the Klamath show we finally got to meet Aaron, the man behind those fabulous videos. Aaron’s enthusiasm and passion for railroading is infectious in his videos and in ‘real life’ too! His latest video is Donner Pass: Stacks in the High Sierras which was just released! We are carrying it in both DVD and Blu-Ray!  Check out the trailer for this brand new Donner video here!

After the show we packed up and got back over the hill just as night (and snow) was beginning to fall. Now it’s time to get ready for the next show!

Happy Railroading!

Locomotives & Hot Sauce – Two Great Tastes That Taste Great Together

October 6th, 2010
Locomotives and hot sauce… two great tastes that taste great together? Why not? B&O Railroad Hot Sauce has released 4 hot sauces inspired by the Baltimore & Ohio. This deserves some exploration…
The Four B&O Railroad Hot Sauces

The Four B&O Railroad Hot Sauces

These bottles of liquid fire are licensed products of the B&O Railroad Museum. Their sauces include: Thunder Fire Hot Sauce commemorating the ‘Fire’ that keeps steam trains alive; Iron Thunder Hot Sauce evoking the power of ‘hundreds of tons of iron roaring down the track’ (and into your mouth); and Fire Box Hot Sauce providing a smoky flavor with aged cayenne red pepper & chipotle in honor of the hottest part of the steam engine, the firebox.

Finally, there is Ghost Train Hot Sauce which according to these Hot Sauce folks commemorates the general phenomenon around the world of ‘Ghost Trains’, phantom locomotives that appear ‘out of nowhere and in an instant, consume your senses’ likely, much like their hot sauce. This sauce is made with the world’s hottest pepper, Bhut Jolokia, which is also known as Ghost Chili.

Naga Jolokia - The World's Hottest Pepper (Photo by Peter Baer)

Bhut Jolokia - The World's Hottest Pepper (Photo by Peter Baer)

But the B&O rails have their own haunted history. In the 1800s there was work going on in the Brandy Gap Tunnel (also known as the Flinderation Tunnel) in West Virginia when a train unexpectedly came through startling the workers. One of the workers was unable to get to a safety alcove in time and was killed by the train which then derailed.  The resulting ‘ghost train’ has been the subject of some television shows such as Ghost Stories on the Travel Channel. Reportedly visitors experience hearing the train’s whistle and sounds of metal scraping the walls when passing through the tunnel which is now part of West Virginia’s 72-mile North Bend Rail Trail.

Haunted Flinderation Tunnel - Photo by Jerry Edmundson

Haunted Flinderation Tunnel - Photo by Jerry Edmundson

Each bottle of B&O Hot Sauce sports an eye-catching railroad label designed by artist Rena Debortoli and brand manager Jamie Klim with photos and art work provided by the B&O Railroad Museum. These sauces would make a great addition to a B&O themed gift when accompanied by a train DVD or maybe even some B&O rolling stock.  Since that’s a fabulous idea, check out the B&O featured products at www.theshortline.com where you can now redeem coupon code BLOG1BO during check out to take an additional 15% off B&O related merchandise! (Valid through December 20, 2010)
Happy (Haunted) Railroading!

Farmer Adds ‘Railroad Owner’ to Résumé

August 18th, 2010

What do you do when the rail line you use to ship your product shuts down on you? Well, if you are Larry Venell of Corvalis, Oregon, you buy that line and add ‘Railroad Owner’ to your résumé.

After the Portland & Western (PNWR) halted service on the Bailey Branch, also referred to as the Monroe-Dawson line, Larry Venell spent 2 years attempting to purchase the line. Now, following a $750, 000 repair project on his purchase, a 5.35-mile stretch of the line running from milepost 682.25 near Greenberry to milepost 687.6 near Corvalis, the Venell Farms Railroad Company (VFRC) made its first wheat shipment on their own line on August 6th 2010.

Venell Farms’ loads are hauled by Albany & Eastern (AERC) a shortline based in Lebanon, Oregon.

Albany & Eastern Crossing the Santiam River, Lebanon, Oregon Photo by: Bruce Fingerhood July 2002

Albany & Eastern Crossing the Santiam River, Lebanon, Oregon Photo by: Bruce Fingerhood July 2002

I Coulda Been A Gongoozler

May 26th, 2010
Today while watching the Pentrex DVD,  Southern Pacific Film Archives Combo, I found myself recalling childhood memories of waving at these very same trains in Southern California. These were the trains that turned me into a Railfan! This led me to contemplate the beginnings of Railfanning.

Evidence of the first Railfan (or Trainspotter as he would be known in the UK) can be found in the National Railway Museum in York. A 14-year old boy observed and wrote a description of the opening of the Stockton to Darlington Railway and the world’s first steam passenger train in 1825. In a letter home to his sisters, John Backhouse wrote:

It was a very grand sight to see such a mass of people moving on the road from Stockton to Darlington, 600 people were said to be in, on and about the wagons and coaches! And the engine drew not less that 90 tons!!!!!”

He even includes a drawing to help describe this new technological marvel to his readers.

John Backhouse Drawing of the Stockton to Darlington Railway

John Backhouse Drawing of the Stockton to Darlington Railway

Apparently, there have been Railfans since trains emerged onto the transportation landscape and luckily for contemporary Railfans, people have been documenting railroads since the beginning as well.

The first “train” movie was filmed in 1895; almost as soon as cinematic technology was available people were choosing to put trains on film! You can enjoy, Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat (The Lumière Brothers, 1895), through the wonder that is YouTube. One of the challenges to Railfans has been the ever-threatening disappearance of the object of their affection, I’m grateful to those who spent their time and money creating video records of locomotives that Railfans of today would not be able to experience any other way. 

In reflecting on the origins of Railfanning, I wonder about other hobbies that share a common link with ours.  You may have heard of Aircraft Spotting…

Famous Russian Aircraft Spotter Sergei Alexandrov at Work (Photo by Villa16)

Famous Russian Aircraft Spotter Sergei Alexandrov at Work (Photo by Villa16)

But have you heard of Bus Spotting?

Bus Spotters in Action! (Photo Credit: Arriva436)

Bus Spotters in Action! (Photo Credit: Arriva436)

Satellite Spotting?

Ed Morana imaged the International Space Station as it crossed in front of the Moon.

Ed Morana imaged the International Space Station as it crossed in front of the Moon.

What about Roadgeeks? (fans of all things road-related) or Gongoozlers? (fans of all things canal-related)…. These are the Railfan’s brethren! Unite ye hobbyists! Embrace your inner geek!

How big is a Quaffle in O Scale anyway?

November 10th, 2009
A few nights ago on Ace of Cakes, Duff and the team reproduced the Hogwarts Express train (it looked like they had the Lionel O-Gauge version as a reference.)  As an owner of the Lionel Hogwarts Express train set I thought this was pretty cool.  As incredible cake designers, they must have to deal with scale on a regular basis, just like model train layout designers do!
Tom Felton, Duff Goldman (The Ace of Cakes) and the Hogwarts Express Cake

Tom Felton, Duff Goldman (The Ace of Cakes) and the Hogwarts Express Cake

I have started planning my own model train layout which when finished will be a replica of the Hogwarts Quidditich Pitch (pitch is what the field is called) with the Lionel O-Gauge Hogwarts Express train set going around it.  In order to design and make my own Quidditch pitch and accoutrement, math is involved. But fear not! I am equipped with fancy tools like, the Internet!
Hogwarts Quidditch Pitch

Hogwarts Quidditch Pitch

First I need to get some measurements on the pitch, etc.  Wikipedia is happy to oblige with their Quidditch entry.  Here I find some of the stats I need to begin. Next I need to convert these numbers into the scale for my layout, which is the US O Scale ratio of 1/48.  To help me do that I find another tool, a handy website with a Javascript scale conversion calculator.

Below you can see the table I started entering my data on:

My scale conversion table

My scale conversion table

You may have noticed the pitch is supposed to be 10 feet by 3.75 feet… this size is probably going to be prohibitive.  I think I can probably get away with shrinking the size of the pitch down while keeping the rest of the items (people, stands, hoops, balls) at the proper scale.

Granted, the Wikipedia entry on Quidditch didn’t have all of the measurements I needed but this will give me a great start in laying out some of the elements on my diagram (picture, if you will, many, many sheets of graph paper taped together…I really LOVE graph paper…but more about that in another installment.)

Hello world!

November 2nd, 2009

Hello and thanks for visiting! This blog documents exciting aspects of Model Railroading and personal explorations while creating our layouts and running our model train and railfan business, The Short Line Model Railroad Supply. Enjoy!